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Native Freshwater Mussels

 

Photo Gallery

Eastern elliptios, Elliptio complanata. Diver. Persons counting mussels.
In this group of eastern elliptios (Elliptio complanata), the incurrent siphon (the siphon the mussel uses to draw water) is most visible on the centre mussel. The siphon has hair-like papillae to detect particles in the water that are undesirable or too large. The mussel shuts quickly to eject such particles. A second siphon, at the top of the shell, expels the filtered water.
Sampling native freshwater mussels in Mooneys Bay.
During an inventory mussels are taken from the River, then quickly sorted, counted and returned.
Floater, Pyganodon sp. Glochidia of a floater (Pyganodon sp.), seen through a microscope. Eastern elliptio, Elliptio complanata.
A floater (a species of Pyganodon), filtering water.
Glochidia (larvae) of a floater (a species of Pyganodon), seen through a microscope. Note the small hook that the glochidia use to attach themselves to the fins or gills of their fish host.
Eastern elliptio, Elliptio complanata.
Eastern lampmussel, Lampsilis radiata. Eastern floater, Pyganodon cataracta. Fluted shell, Lasmigona costata.
Eastern lampmussel, Lampsilis radiata.
Eastern floater, Pyganodon cataracta.
Fluted shell, Lasmigona costata.
  Black sandshell, Ligumia recta.  
 
Black sandshell,
Ligumia recta
.
 

 

 Native Mussels
Arrow.
Arrow.
Arrow.
Arrow.
 Don't Overlook...
Bullet.
Arrow.
Arrow.
Arrow.

Click on each photo to see it in a larger size.
A Project of the Canadian Museum of Nature
 Images: Jacqueline Madill, André Martel, Judy Redpath, Aleta Karstad Schueler