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Text: Native Plant Crossroads. Photo: Bunchberry, Cornus canadensis. Text logo: nature.ca / Canadian Museum of Nature.
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Wild columbine, Aquilegia canadensis. Text: What You Can Do. Graphic: A circle with an arrow inside.
Text: Conservation Issues. Graphic: A circle with an arrow inside.
Text: Resources. Graphic: A circle with an arrow inside.
Text: Glossary. Graphic: A circle with an arrow inside.
Wild columbine, Aquilegia canadensis. Join us at the crossroads, enrich your understanding of native plants, learn about the issues and find out what you can do!

Native plants are an essential component in the biodiversity that sustains life on Earth. It is imperative that we improve their situation, and we can do so by understanding them better, actively fostering and conserving them, and sharing information.

Stimulating interested citizens to take action towards biodiversity conservation is the ultimate goal of this Web site. This goal is shared by a larger initiative, of which the site is a component: In 2002, the Canadian Centre for Biodiversity at the Canadian Museum of Nature, with the assistance of The Salamander Foundation, initiated Best Stewardship Practices at the Community Level: Enhancing Native Plant Biodiversity. The aim of this initiative is to improve understanding of native plant diversity and facilitate the sharing of information. It does so by encouraging communication, networking and collaboration among diverse groups and active individuals who are involved in environmental stewardship in their communities.

 

The Canadian Museum of Nature's Canadian Centre for Biodiversity is proud to present this Web site, which was generously funded by The Salamander Foundation.

 

Text: People in action. Photo of barrens willow, Salix jejuna.

Life in the Limestone Barrens
A life-changing, life-preserving experience

White trillium, Trillium grandiflorum S84-4772.
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The spring-blooming flowers of white trillium (Trillium grandiflorum) start out white and fade to pink as the flowers age. A plant can live for at least 26 years (the age can be measured by rings on the rhizome, but rings older than 26 years are typically lost or obscured by rot). Trilliums will not flower until they are 15 years old. Population survival can be jeopardized in areas where they are heavily browsed by deer because the plants will die out after about 12 years of repeated browsing.


 

 
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Last Update: 2010-04-16
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