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Text: Native Plant Crossroads. Photo: Bunchberry, Cornus canadensis. Text logo: nature.ca / Canadian Museum of Nature.
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Wild columbine, Aquilegia canadensis. Text: What You Can Do. Graphic: A circle with an arrow inside.
Text: Conservation Issues. Graphic: A circle with an arrow inside.
Text: Resources. Graphic: A circle with an arrow inside.
Text: Glossary. Graphic: A circle with an arrow inside.
Wild columbine, Aquilegia canadensis. Join us at the crossroads, enrich your understanding of native plants, learn about the issues and find out what you can do!

Native plants are an essential component in the biodiversity that sustains life on Earth. It is imperative that we improve their situation, and we can do so by understanding them better, actively fostering and conserving them, and sharing information.

Stimulating interested citizens to take action towards biodiversity conservation is the ultimate goal of this Web site. This goal is shared by a larger initiative, of which the site is a component: In 2002, the Canadian Centre for Biodiversity at the Canadian Museum of Nature, with the assistance of The Salamander Foundation, initiated Best Stewardship Practices at the Community Level: Enhancing Native Plant Biodiversity. The aim of this initiative is to improve understanding of native plant diversity and facilitate the sharing of information. It does so by encouraging communication, networking and collaboration among diverse groups and active individuals who are involved in environmental stewardship in their communities.

 

The Canadian Museum of Nature's Canadian Centre for Biodiversity is proud to present this Web site, which was generously funded by The Salamander Foundation.

 

Text: People in action. Photo of rose twisted-stalk, Streptopus lanceolatus.

Big Seed from Little Bug
Meeting a need, making the grade

Beaked hazel, Corylus cornuta S84-4971.
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Although a shrub, the beaked hazel (Corylus cornuta) is a member of the birch family. Male and female flowers are separate, but are on the same bush. This is a female flower, which is much smaller and more colourful than the male. The fruits ripen into edible nuts (hazelnuts) in autumn. For centuries, native peoples used the wood to make arrows, and in some areas the buds and roots were used to make a blue dye. In Canada, the plant is found in moist woods and thickets from British Columbia to Newfoundland and Labrador.


 

 
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