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Text: Birds.
Photo: Kagu, Rhynochetos jubatus.
Kagu, Rhynochetos jubatus
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Where are they found? Oceania

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This flightless bird lives only in the rainforests of the Pacific island of New Caledonia. Studies conducted in the 1990s suggested that there are fewer than 1000 Kagus remaining.

Kagus were trapped in early times by the Melanesians, and later by Europeans.

The island range of the Kagu gradually retreated to the interior mountains and valleys, but much of this remaining habitat was subsequently destroyed by nickel-mining activities. Domestic dogs, cats, pigs and rats are the most serious threat to the species' survival.

No other birds are closely related to the Kagu; it is the sole representative of its Family. Kagus are generally about 55 cm (22 in.) long. Their feathers are light grey and its head has a whitish crest.

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