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Bird Bingo

Winter is a great time to spot local birds. Their colourful plumage stands out against the white snow as they search for food.

Take a closer look at the birds around you this winter with this bingo game. Challenge your friends and family to see who is first to complete a full row, or even the whole card!

Download the bingo card (PDF).

Get to Know Some of the Bingo Birds!

Illustration of a female American Goldfinch.

American Goldfinch, Female
Did you know that some birds use spider-web silk in the construction of their nest? Female American Goldfinches will seek out this resilient, yet flexible material and weave it into their nests so tightly that the nest can become waterproof. Males undergo drastic colour changes as they enter the breeding season, donning a bright yellow plumage in the summer months. Attract goldfinches to your feeder using Nyjer seed (the seed of the African yellow daisy), their favourite food! © stock.adobe.com

Illustration of a male American Goldfinch.

American Goldfinch, Male
Did you know that some birds use spider-web silk in the construction of their nest? Female American Goldfinches will seek out this resilient, yet flexible material and weave it into their nests so tightly that the nest can become waterproof. Males undergo drastic colour changes as they enter the breeding season, donning a bright yellow plumage in the summer months. Attract goldfinches to your feeder using Nyjer seed (the seed of the African yellow daisy), their favourite food! © stock.adobe.com

Illustration of a female Northern Cardinal.

Northern Cardinal, Female
These North American birds were named by European settlers who, upon seeing the males of the species, were reminded of the rich red vestments of the leading bishops of the Catholic Church: the cardinals. Want to see this beautiful red plumage for yourself? You can lure a cardinal to your bird feeder using their favourite food: sunflower seeds! © stock.adobe.com

Illustration of a male Northern Cardinal.

Northern Cardinal, Male
These North American birds were named by European settlers who, upon seeing the males of the species, were reminded of the rich red vestments of the leading bishops of the Catholic Church: the cardinals. Want to see this beautiful red plumage for yourself? You can lure a cardinal to your bird feeder using their favourite food: sunflower seeds! © stock.adobe.com

Illustration of a female Evening Grosbeak.

Evening Grosbeak, Female
This heavily built finch (body length 16 to 22 cm), once abundant across Canada, saw a 97% decline the eastern part of its range between 1966 and 2015. Recent declines could be attributed to increased logging and development in the mixed boreal forests of northern North America. Although they may not show up at your feeder regularly, Evening Grosbeaks are attracted by sunflower seeds. Preferring to nest in mixed boreal forest, these birds can be found throughout southern Canada during spring and summer. © stock.adobe.com

Illustration of a male Evening Grosbeak.

Evening Grosbeak, Male
This heavily built finch (body length 16 to 22 cm), once abundant across Canada, saw a 97% decline the eastern part of its range between 1966 and 2015. Recent declines could be attributed to increased logging and development in the mixed boreal forests of northern North America. Although they may not show up at your feeder regularly, Evening Grosbeaks are attracted by sunflower seeds. Preferring to nest in mixed boreal forest, these birds can be found throughout southern Canada during spring and summer. © stock.adobe.com

Illustration of a Blue Jay.

Blue Jay
Did you know that Blue Jay wings are pigmented with melanin, the same brown pigment found in human hair and skin? A Blue Jay's feather is made of many tiny barbs, which refract blue light, and allow other colours to pass through and be absorbed by the melanin, leaving only the refracted blue light to be seen by our eyes. If you want to see this optical illusion for yourself, you can lure Blue Jays to your bird feeder using their favourite food: peanuts! © stock.adobe.com

Illustration of a female Downy Woodpecker.

Downy Woodpecker, Female
Did you know woodpeckers don't sing songs? Instead, they "drum" on wood or metal for the same effect. Some people think that this "drumming" is part of the bird's feeding habits, but it's not! Surprisingly, woodpeckers make very little noise when digging or feeding. Downy Woodpeckers are common at bird feeders, can be attracted with suet and peanuts, and can often be found in mixed flocks with chickadees and other small birds. © stock.adobe.com

Illustration of a male Downy Woodpecker.

Downy Woodpecker, Male
Did you know woodpeckers don't sing songs? Instead, they "drum" on wood or metal for the same effect. Some people think that this "drumming" is part of the bird's feeding habits, but it's not! Surprisingly, woodpeckers make very little noise when digging or feeding. Downy Woodpeckers are common at bird feeders, can be attracted with suet and peanuts, and can often be found in mixed flocks with chickadees and other small birds. © stock.adobe.com

Illustration of a group of Chickadees.

Chickadee
While this bird's normal call is a gentle "fee-bee", it is reputedly named after its warning call "chick-a-dee-dee-dee". Did you know the number of "dees" in a Chickadee call changes depending on the predator? The more dangerous the predator, the more "dees" in the alarm calls. Want to hear this call for yourself? You can attract chickadees to your feeder using sunflower seeds! © stock.adobe.com

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